05 February 2011

gestural expression

gestural expression

Experienced artists, even before they ask themselves, "What does the subject look like?" ask,
 "What is the subject doing?"
That is, how does the arrangement of the major parts of the figure, the flower, the lamp, or the landscape allude to movement? What suggestions are there in the subject of directed energies coursing through its forms? For virtually everything we see implies some kind and degree of moving action. Such actions are inherent in the subject's formation and structure. The gentle curve of a tree limb or a human one, the forceful thrust of a church spire or a schooner, the graceful spiral of a staircase or a seashell, all these suggest moving actions–types of animated behavior; in other words, they all disclose some kind of gestural expression.
–Nathan Goldstein, The Art of Responsive Drawing, Chapter 1, "Gestural Expression," page 3.


image:Rembrandt Van Rijn (1606-1669), Saskia Asleep, Pen, brush, and ink, 13 x 17.1 cm, The Pierpont Morgan Library, New York. I, 180.


Here is a link to Chapter 1, "Gestural Expression," from Nathan Goldstein, The Art of Responsive Drawing. 

The link will direct you to the blue drive.

The username and password are the same as your UW-Stout email.

Click here to get the chapter.

No comments:

RSS Subscribe